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Each page takes less than a minute to produce, although for colour pages four versions, once each for black, cyan, magenta and yellow are sent. The pages are then processed into photographic negatives and the film is used to produce aluminium printing plates ready for the presses. ROBOTS AT WORK

but I'm always use then between to phrases (when it is mean: next or after that).

Let me finish this job, then we'll go.

My question is: Can we use it before tha man verb?

Let me finish this job, we'll then go.

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    @TeacherKSHuang - With "then we'll go", period, I'd asked where to too. So to me, it's the context, not the placement of "then", which is irrelevant - again, to me personally;) – Victor B. Feb 23 '17 at 12:12
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    Maybe it's a dialect or regional thing, but "...then we'll go." sounds fine to this native NYC speaker. To me, it just means "then we'll leave this place." – stangdon Feb 23 '17 at 12:30
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    @stangdon - So it does to me. I only meant that if you feel like asking "where to", the placement of "then" is not the thing that got you focused upon it:) – Victor B. Feb 23 '17 at 12:41
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    @Rompey, stangdon, so then we'll all agree to agree :D? – Teacher KSHuang Feb 24 '17 at 8:43
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    @TeacherKSHuang - Personally, always respecting opinions different to mine, I don't see anything here to agree to disagree upon. Have a nice day:-) – Victor B. Feb 24 '17 at 9:16
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Adverbs of time can be placed at the start of a sentence, after an auxiliary verb/modal, before a main verb or at the end of a sentence:

Soon we must make decision
we must soon make a decision
we must make a decision soon.

With so many choices of location, even small things affect the placement. In the case of your sentence, one of the things that may affect it is the rhythm. For this meaning, the word then must be a strong syllable, and in the first sentence go is also a strong syllable, giving a nice rhythm.

Let me finish this job, then we'll go.

The second sentence also requires go to be a strong syllable, which puts two strong syllables next to each other: we generally avoid this rhythm if possible.

Let me finish this job: we'll then go.

If we add some more information, for example a where clause, go loses its stress, which moves to the where clause, and we find this rhythm much more comfortable.

Let me finish this job: we'll then go and get something to eat.

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Let me finish this job, then we'll go.

Let me finish this job, we'll then go.

I think, that "then" can go in either place; although I think most people would tend to put it at the start of the sentence. And I'd write it as two separate sentences, or use a semicolon after "job":

Let me finish this job. Then we'll go.

Let me finish this job; we'll then go.

See the Ngram Viewer.

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