1

The patient is ready for the discharge.

Or

The patient is ready to discharge.

If you could please explain why one is a better construct than the other.

  • 1
    Heh, I think what you want to say is probably Option 3, "The patient is ready to be discharged." Now, if you want to include some sexual innuendos, all three of them (including mine), are correct in their respective forms :D. – Teacher KSHuang Mar 3 '17 at 12:01
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    Actually, I would say "The patient is ready for discharge", because discharge functions as sort of a general concept here. – stangdon Mar 3 '17 at 12:20
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    "for the discharge" sounds really gross... – Catija Mar 3 '17 at 22:52
  • Without knowing what you intend it to mean, we can not answer which is correct. – Catija Mar 3 '17 at 22:57
  • "the patient is ready for the discharge" sounds like the patient is being prepared for electric shock therapy. – JavaLatte Mar 4 '17 at 12:53
2

The patient is ready to be discharged.

I think this is what you're looking for. This means that the hospital has deemed the patient OK to leave.

The patient is ready for the discharge.

This means that there is some sort of a discharge and the patient is ready to receive it.

The patient is ready to discharge.

This means that the patient is ready to unload something (a discharge) from inside the patient.


Just note that all three have three very different meanings, as elucidated above.

I have given you my suggestion for the one I think you want, but you may want to decide for yourself based on my given meanings above.

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  • May someone please roll back the edit made by Catija and perhaps un-delete the comments that had expressed plainly why I had formatted this the way that I had.... Thank you. – Teacher KSHuang Mar 6 '17 at 7:37
0

"The discharge" wouldn't apply in this kind of usage. Where that might make sense is if the patient's treatment including discharging something. Saying the patient was ready for the discharge would mean the treatment could proceed.

Leaving out "the", the options reflect two different perspectives.

The patient is ready for discharge.

Here "discharge" refers to a condition or status; being in a state of no longer being a patient. The focus is on the status of the patient, and "discharge" is in the sense of leaving, as in "The patient is ready to leave." It could refer to all preparations for being discharged having been completed or the patient's state of mind.

The patient is ready to discharge.

Here "discharge" refers to an action. The focus is on the hospital's procedures and the patient is ready for the next step, which is for the discharge to be implemented.

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