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I'd like to explain the idea that I don't want to pursue only one hobby, but I'm unsure if in English there is a difference using only before or after the number. Which one is correct and why?

I like to find new interests and don't be stuck into one only hobby.

or

I like to find new interests and don't be stuck into only one hobby.

  • In that example, only "only one" works. – Lawrence Mar 4 '17 at 11:58
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"Only one" functions as a quantifier, and can be used pretty well anywhere that "one" could be used as a quantifier.

"One only hobby" could only be parsed with the archaic adjectival use of "only" meaning "sole" or "single". (It survives in the fixed expression "an only child", but is otherwise confined to historical and literary usage).

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