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Is this sentence right?

I will cook dinner, as well as wash the car.

Or it should be

I will cook dinner, as well as washing the car?

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  • In this example, "as well as" is a fancier way of saying "and". If you replace it with "and", the answer should become clear.
    – MorganFR
    Commented Mar 2, 2017 at 14:36

2 Answers 2

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As well as is a way of saying "and" in fact. Therefore, especially in the academic or formal papers we are more likely to use it. However, the first sentence is the one which is correct. You always check the correctness by replacing the "as well as" with "and." Plus, although I am not 100% sure, I wouldn't use that comma in between.

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    You know as well as I do that "as well as" and "and" are not always interchangeable. :D
    – MorganFR
    Commented Mar 2, 2017 at 15:14
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'As well as' has a similar meaning to 'not only...but also'.

When we put a verb after 'as well as', we most often use the -ing form.

She sings as well as playing the piano. ( She not only plays, but also sings).

She sings as well as she plays the piano. ( Her singing is as good as her playing).

So, if you not only cook dinner but also wash the car, you would say:

I cook dinner as well as washing the car.

(Based on Michael Swan's PEU)

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Also from English Language Help Desk

"Verbs after as well as come in –ing form

When we put a verb after as well as, we use the -ing form of the verb. (This might sound really strange to a non-native speaker, but the grammar books agree on this.)

Running is healthy as well as making you feel good. He broke the window, as well as destroying the wall. She draws as well as designing clothes.

Note the difference between the last sentence and the next one:

She draws as well as she designs clothes. [Her drawing is as good as her designing]"

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  • I disagree with this, I think they should be parallel constructions. Maybe I will be cooking dinner as well as washing the car.
    – Barmar
    Commented Mar 2, 2017 at 20:38
  • I cook dinner as well as washing the car is totally wrong. If you wanted to say that you not only cook dinner but also wash the car, using 'as well as', you would say I cook dinner as well as wash the car.
    – Rob K
    Commented Mar 2, 2017 at 20:46
  • @Barmar: I've added a screen shot from Michael Swan's Practical English Usage to substantiate my answer. If you believe my answer is wrong, instead of simply saying, please prove it with enough citations. Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 2:17
  • @RobK:Please provide enough citations to support your arguments, and prove my answer is wrong. Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 2:19
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    @mahmudkoya I wonder if this still applies when using the future tense. It seems like he's saying "I will washing the car".
    – Barmar
    Commented Mar 3, 2017 at 2:31

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