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which one is correct :

I prefer to live with someone rather than to live alone

or

I prefer to live with someone rather than living alone

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Either is correct, but this form is usually constructed with a parallel structure.

I prefer living with someone rather than living alone

However, when the main clause is written with a to-infinitival verb, we usually use a bare-infinitival verb after rather than.

I prefer to live with someone rather than live alone

It's also possible to use the -ing form, especially when the rather-than structure precedes the sentence.

Rather than living alone, I prefer to live with someone.


Reference

Practical English Usage(PEU) Second Edition by Michael Swan

-1

They're both correct but have slightly different implications.

I prefer to live with someone rather than to live alone.

This implies that at the moment you could be either living with someone or living alone, it is unclear which.

I prefer to live with someone rather than living alone.

This implies that at the moment you are in fact living alone.

  • Why do you think they have different implications? Do you have a source for that? – stangdon Mar 6 '17 at 22:51
  • @stangdon living is the gerund and in this context implies that this is the current state of affairs. My source is 50+ years of usage. – Chris M Mar 7 '17 at 6:32
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    Yes, living is a gerund. How does it imply that it's a current state of affairs? Gerunds simply refer to a particular act of a verb, not a current state. I'm also a native speaker with decades of usage. – stangdon Mar 7 '17 at 11:45
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    By way of explaining what I'm saying, consider "I prefer sailing to skiing" - both of those are gerunds, but clearly there's no implication that I'm performing either one at the moment of speaking. – stangdon Mar 7 '17 at 11:59
  • @stangdon the difference is very slight but to my mind the sentence with living alone would imply that person was actually doing that whereas the sentence with to live alone implies that they may not. – Chris M Mar 7 '17 at 16:24

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