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I was trying to proof read an article about USA/Philippines trade with the following paragraph:

The statistics of 2016 help us predict the future of fastener business between the USA and Philippines. According to the statistics, the Philippines business in November 2016 has not been affected, and it can be translated to that the U.S. and Philippines continue their relationship as before.

I wanted to correct it to "it can be translated to the fact that the U.S. and Philippines continue their relationship as before", or "it can be translated to a situation where the U.S. and Philippines continue their relationship as before" but I'm not sure if the author of this paragraph was grammatically correct in the first place.

Could anyone tell me whether I'm right to correct it or how should I correct it if need be?

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    Where did you find article? From what I learned, that-clause cannot be a complement of a preposition. – user178049 Mar 7 '17 at 3:50
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My idea is that the clause in bold refers to another way to say what is being written about (sort of translated in meaning rather than language).

The statistics of 2016 help us predict the future of fastener business between the USA and Philippines. According to the statistics, the Philippines business in November 2016 has not been affected, and it can be translated to 'that the U.S. and Philippines continue their relationship as before'.

"continuing the relationship" having the same intent as "the Philippines business ... has not been affected".

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