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I have the following exercise on translating sentences. I've written the next sentences:

  1. By the time they finish talking, the lesson will have been over, Nick will have had a shower and will have been ready to go back home with his mother.
  2. Nick will have done his homework in two hours and will be quite free.
  3. When I arrive to them Nick with his parents will be having dinner.
  4. We'll be playing computer games after dinner.
  5. Mrs. Collins will have made coffee by the time we finish (have finished) playing.
  6. We will be sitting in the hall and drinking hot coffee. Then I'll go back home.

The keys for the 1st, 5th and 6th are:

  • will have finished their talk, will have been over, will have had a shower, will have been ready;
  • will have made, have stopped;
  • will be sit and drink.

I'm stuck with some questions:

  1. for the first sentence it isn't acceptable to use future perfect (will have finished their talk) - it's a time conjunction as far as I know, don't I? And could I say "will have taken a shower" instead of "will have had a shower"?
  2. Could I say "will have prepared coffee" and does "stop / have stopped" sounds awkward?
  3. Why Future Simple for the last questin in the list?
  4. Does the 3rd sentence have a correct structure (or "will be having dinner with his parents")?

I've written all of them in one topic because each is connected with one another and can't be get from the context.

P.S.: I'm not a native but really want to know my mistakes if there are any.

closed as too broad by LMS, stangdon, shin, Glorfindel, choster Mar 8 '17 at 22:19

Please edit the question to limit it to a specific problem with enough detail to identify an adequate answer. Avoid asking multiple distinct questions at once. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    I've voted to close your question as being too broad. Generally, a post on ELL should consist of a single question, or one main question with very closely related questions on aspects related to the main question. You should split this post into multiple posts. – LMS Mar 8 '17 at 12:20
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    We tend to use the future perfect to refer to an event-in-time, not to a persistent state. over and ready are states which persist, and we would use the simple future with them, "will be over" and "will be ready", but "Nick will have had his shower", since "to have a shower" is an event-in-time. We could also say "will be showered" since "showered" is the state one is in after taking a shower. The future perfect establishes the temporal sequential relationship of two things in the future. Two persistent states would be coeval, not sequential. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Mar 8 '17 at 12:36
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    To keep the question open, I suggest you edit it to focus only on the future perfect vs future simple, and put the future continuous questions in another question. I've changed the title to reflect the gist of a question that could remain open. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Mar 8 '17 at 12:44
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  1. By the time they finish talking, the lesson will have been over, Nick will have had a shower and will have been ready to go back home with his mother.

    By the time they finish talking the lesson will be over, Nick will have had a shower and be ready to go back home with his mother.

    By the time they've finished talking the lesson will be over, Nick will have had a shower and be ready to go back home with his mother.

You would only use the future perfect for the second clause and fourth clause if they are complemented with time periods.

...the lesson will have been over for some time ... will have been ready for a while to go back home with his mother.

  1. Correct

  2. When I arrive to them Nick with his parents will be having dinner.

    When I arrive Nick will be having dinner with his parents.

    When I arrive at their house Nick will be having dinner with his parents. By the time I arrive ...

The verb arrive takes at not to.

  1. Correct

  2. Mrs. Collins will have made coffee by the time we finish (have finished) playing.

    Mrs Collins will have made coffee by the time we finish playing.

    Mrs Collins will have made coffee by the time we've finished playing. Both are correct.

  3. We will be sitting in the hall and drinking hot coffee. Then I'll go back home.

    We'll sit in the hall and drink hot coffee, then I'll go home.

    We'll be sitting in the hall and drinking hot coffee when she arrives, then I'll go home.

    You'll be sitting in the hall and drinking hot coffee as I go home.

The continuous tense needs a clause to contemporaneous clause to complement it.

In all cases within a clause with two or more verbs you don't need to repeat will if it applies to all of them.

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