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What should I say to person that wanted to help me and eventually didn't or couldn't do that?

If I translate it from my language then it is supposed to be: "thank you for your wishing to help". Does it work in English as well or there is alternatives?

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  • It depends, do you want to be nice or sarcastic?
    – Andrew
    Mar 10, 2017 at 16:28
  • Nice and polite. Mar 10, 2017 at 16:29
  • For example: scenario 1: if I asked from someone to send me some papers from the course that I was absent in, and I saw that he didn't send me it fast and I asked from another one who sent me it immediately while the first person sent me it late when I already didn't need it. Scenario 2: I asked from the teacher to explain me something but unfortunately he can't today - when I need it (day before of the class) because he's sick, although he would like to help me. Mar 10, 2017 at 16:33

1 Answer 1

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It depends on the context. If the other person sincerely meant to help, but couldn't, you can say something like:

Thanks anyway

Thanks for offering to help.

Thanks, I appreciate that you wanted to help (out).

And various other expressions. Of course, you might be upset that this person agreed to help but didn't, in which case you can use sarcasm:

Thanks for nothing!

Some help you were!

And others. You can also say many of the "nice" expressions, but with a sarcastic tone.

Oh yeah, you were a real help.

Because any of the "nice" expressions can be sarcastic you do have to be careful with your tone, if you don't want the other person to inadvertently take offense. "Thanks anyway" can seem very curt and dismissive, if you don't say it nicely and sincerely.

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  • Thank you. These are contexts for example: scenario 1: if I asked from someone to send me some papers from the course that I was absent in, and I saw that he didn't send me it fast and I asked from another one who sent me it immediately while the first person sent me it late when I already didn't need it. Scenario 2: I asked from the teacher to explain me something but unfortunately he can't today - when I need it (day before of the class) because he's sick, although he would like to help me. Mar 10, 2017 at 16:34
  • Well, this is more etiquette than language. In the first scenario I would just thank the person who sent me the papers even late. There's no need to imply they were too slow. In the second scenario, "thanks, I understand" is probably OK.
    – Andrew
    Mar 10, 2017 at 16:37

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