1

Here is the phrase which I am reading:

The only fully equipped centre of its kind, TANUVAS’ critical care unit has come to the rescue of many a pet
Source: A go-to place to save animals in their golden hour

  • 2
    Please consider adding the source of your sentence to your question. It might not be absolutely needed, but it's good practice anyway. – Damkerng T. Mar 12 '17 at 15:13
  • Hi @DamkerngT. this is the source thehindu.com/news/national/tamil-nadu/… – RAJA RAM Mar 12 '17 at 16:39
  • @DamkerngT. - You are absolutely right that it's a good practice, and sometimes it's downright necessary. Feel free the cite this meta post next time you leave such a helpful comment. – J.R. Mar 12 '17 at 17:52
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Kind is a noun that is synonym of sort.

A group with similar characteristics, or a particular type. (Cambridge Dictionary online).

The sentence means that there is no other centre as well equipped as TANUVAS’ critical care unit. As it says further down in the article, it's "the best".

Of many a means "a lot of". "Many a" is archaic, you would not use it in everyday conversation.

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    *You would not use "many a" generally in regular conversation. English is all about flow, and sometimes somebody might use it (sounds like the OP's article is pretty modern). Also, if you wanted to be formal, you may use "many a" (more likely in writing than speech). – marcellothearcane Mar 12 '17 at 15:22
  • I don't talk to my friends the same way as I would their parents... I'm definitely less formal in some situations. I always thought it was colloquial? Yes, you are likely to find it in poetry, when you're scraping for that extra syllable! – marcellothearcane Mar 12 '17 at 15:28
  • +1 Though I wonder which the OP was confused by more, between of and many a in of many a pet. – Damkerng T. Mar 12 '17 at 15:50
  • @marcellothearcane "not" was missing in my comment... should read : I would not say "everyday conversation" is "formal speech". It is not written English either. You're more likely to find it in poetry. It is by no means colloquial, quite the opposite, a good answer on ELU about it. – None Mar 13 '17 at 8:07
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Of its kind

This means, in this case, 'which can provide the service that it does'.

In general it means 'which has its particular or similar characteristics, attritubutes or facilities.

https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/of_its_kind

Of many a pet

This means 'of many pets'.

  • beat me by 8 seconds! This article explains the difference between 'many a' versus 'many' – marcellothearcane Mar 12 '17 at 15:17
  • Ha ha! They don't call me speedy Gonzalez.... at all actually 😕 – Chris M Mar 12 '17 at 15:20

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