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This question already has an answer here:

This site says

Be like or what is … like?

We can use be like to ask for a description of someone or something (e.g. their appearance, their character, their behaviour):

What’s your new apartment like?

Not: How is your new apartment like?

What does "someone" mean? Is "a dog" belonged to someone or something?

Is "How is your dog like?" wrong?

marked as duplicate by FumbleFingers, LMS, Glorfindel, Lamplighter, shin Mar 14 '17 at 3:48

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  • someone is a person only: a dog is something. It doesn't make any difference anyway: as your reference says, whether it's someone or something, you still use what not how. – JavaLatte Mar 13 '17 at 20:03
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Someone means 'somebody'. When we speak about dogs, cats and other pets we usually use the pronoun "it" which is referred to inanimate nouns ("something"). If you speak about your pet or a pet you know well, you can use "he" or "she": "I have a dog. He is very clever."

Is "How is your dog like?" wrong?

Yes, it's wrong. "What's your dog like?" is correct.

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The other answers are correct if that is the entire sentence. However, "how", as in "in what way" would be correct in a sentence like this:

How is your dog like a wolf?

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Yes, "a dog" is an example of "someone or something." In fact, everything counts as "someone or something." The real rule is that you say "What is X like?", not "How is X like?" So you would say

What is your dog like?

not

*How is your dog like?

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How is your dog? This is likely a discussion about his health or an already known issue.

How is an adverb and means: (Google Dictionary)

  1. in what way or manner; by what means. "how does it work?"

  2. used to ask about the condition or quality of something. "how was your vacation?"

You are using 'how' instead of 'what". "What is your dog like?" Means 'what is his his behaviour like'? Is he a busy, or worried, or fast running, or nervous or a lazy dog?

I call my dogs 'family' and talk about them as if they are people. 'Someone's, not objects. This is generally assumed to be silly behaviour by other adults -- but understood by others owned by dogs.

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