1

How can you take advantage of this? A gratitude journal is an easy and actually pretty fun way to keep your attention trained on what’s important in life: all the beautiful, exciting and wonderful things that surround youday to day but which you may have forggten to appreciate.

The above contents come from the book The 21 Day of challenge happiness

As for the bold word, trained, is it a past participle? what is the grammatical facts of it?

According to my research, I think trained on is a past participle phrase which modifies attention. Is it true?

1

Trained in this context is a past participle that is being used as an adjective, modifying the direct object attention.

You might also call it a participle adjective.

  • What position? Keep my attention trained, my answer correct, and my drink full. Full, correct, trained: adjectives all. – John Wu Mar 14 '17 at 6:18
  • "Trained" is not a past-participial adjective; it's a past participle verb in the past-participial clause your attention trained on what’s important in life ... which functions as object of "keep". – BillJ Mar 14 '17 at 10:37
  • Not sure you're right. The parts of speech become more obvious if we substitute a word or two, e.g. "A mug is an easy way to keep your coffee warm." Surely warm is not a verb in that context. It's an adjective. Similarly, "A mug is an easy way to keep your coffee warmed" functions exactly the same way, as does "A journal is an easy way to keep your attention trained." The verb in the participle clause is actually keep. The verb in the main clause is is. – John Wu Mar 14 '17 at 10:53
  • @JohnWu I think Bill J is right. Warm is an adjective, and "warmed" is a particial adjevtive, read this. But train and trained are both verb. A verb in a participle clause cannot be infintive, and is is always an auxiliary, it can never be a main verb. – user178049 Mar 14 '17 at 13:11
  • @user you have to be kidding me. Warm is both an adjective and a verb, read your own link (scroll down a bit). Trained can be an adjective (see this link which says: "Adj. 1. trained shaped or conditioned or disciplined by training; often used as a combining form; 'a trained mind'; 'trained pigeons'; 'well-trained servants.'") – John Wu Mar 14 '17 at 16:07
1

A gratitude journal is an easy and actually pretty fun way [to keep your attention trained on what’s important in life].

The bracketed infinitival clause is a complex-transitive clause like "to keep you warm”.

"Trained" is an adjective taking the PP complement "on what's important in life".

Note that the AdjP does not modify "attention": "your attention trained on what’s important in life" is not an NP, not a constituent.

"Your attention" is Object and "trained on what’s important in life" is a Predicative Complement.

  • what does NP stand for? So trained is the complement of object ‘your attention’, is that right @BillJ? – Henry Wang Mar 16 '17 at 8:29
  • NP = noun phrase. Yes, the adjective phrase "trained on what's important in life" is objective Complement. It refers to the noun phrase "your attention". – BillJ Mar 16 '17 at 8:35
  • Thanks,could you check another question of mine?ell.stackexchange.com/questions/122657/… – Henry Wang Mar 16 '17 at 8:40

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.