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Is it correct from the native's point of view to say:

  1. Where you going in such a hurry?

or I'd rather say:

  1. Where are you in such a hurry?
  • 1
    1) is fine. 2) Where are you going in such a hurry?" – WRX Mar 14 '17 at 15:00
  • @Willow, so I could use both the first without the auxiliary "to be" or the second (the variant of yours)? – Anthony Voronkov Mar 14 '17 at 15:03
  • What about placing "a" article before "such"? "Where you going in a such a hurry?" is this correct? – SovereignSun Mar 14 '17 at 15:15
  • Neither is correct. I think Willow might have overlooked the missing to be. In standard usage, you cannot omit either the main verb or the auxiliary verb. Also, "in a such a hurry" doesn't make any sense, because you only use one article with a noun; you're already using one in a hurry, and such is not a noun. – stangdon Mar 14 '17 at 15:23
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    1 could be an example of a null copula. ell.stackexchange.com/questions/122452/frankie-you-all-right/… – JavaLatte Mar 14 '17 at 16:01
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Where you going in such a hurry?

Without the verb to be is colloquial or dialectical.

Where are you going in such a hurry?

This is standard English whether British, North American or wherever.

Where you are in such a hurry?

This is neither colloquial nor standard, nor grammatical.

Why are you in such a hurry?

This is an acceptable version.

All of the above is from a native Brit's perspective.

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