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Conditional sentence type 2 means that condition is unreal (unlikely to happen) and it refers to the present or to the future. Example:

If I found her address, I would send her an invitation.

My question is: if we transform this sentence into reported/indirect speech, with the verb "said", how will it sound? Something like that:

John said: "If I found her address, I would send her an invitation."

This is direct speech, but how to report it without the quotes?

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Conditional sentence type 2 means that condition is unreal (unlikely to happen) and it refers to the present or to the future.

Sigh. It's sentences like this that make those of us who study English grammar wish that people would stop teaching the "1st, 2nd, 3rd etc conditionals".

Your teachers have apparently never told you that the construction with a past construction in the condition clause and would VERB in the consequence clause does not necessarily indicate an "unreal" (that is, counterfactual) condition. (In fact one authority, Conditionals: A Comprehensive Empirical Analysis by Declerck and Reed, distinguishes eight different uses for this construction!)

If I found her address, I would send her an invitation.

This sentence does not express a present counterfactual: a promise of a future action (send her an invitation) contingent on a future possibility (find her address) may be 'non-factual' or 'not-yet-factual' but cannot be counterfactual

The most likely interpretation of this sentence is that it expresses a contingency and a consequence which were prospectively possible in the past. Its most likely context is a narrative in which it acts as exactly the indirect-speech report which you're looking for:

I told him I'd do all I could: if I found her address I would send her an invitation.

(It's also possible that it means "I made a habit of sending her an invitation on every occasion when I found her address"—but that's such an odd thing to say that it doesn't seem very likely.)

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John said (that) if he found her address, he would send her an invitation.

I don't think it's that complicated, just change the subject as necessary.

Management said, "If we had good sales this quarter we would pay a bonus."

Management said (that) if we had good sales this quarter they would pay a bonus.

Note that I only changed one of the "we" pronouns to "they". The first "we" is talking about the company as a whole, while the second refers specifically to management. The actual subject you use will vary depending on context:

Dave said, "If you saw a penny, I would pick it up."

Dave said (that) if I saw a penny he would pick it up.

For any reported speech the conjunction "that" is helpful but not necessary. It helps set apart the following phrase so the listener interprets it as reported speech, although most of the time it's clear from context.

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