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I am trying to understand the usage of each word. Is it possible to use any of these words as alternative to the others ?

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    Have you consulted a dictionary? Mar 15, 2017 at 10:41
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    @user178049 not yet
    – Krebto
    Mar 15, 2017 at 10:43
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    @krebto Any dictionary will clearly define the meanings of these three absolutely different words. Mar 15, 2017 at 10:49

2 Answers 2

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  • Content

The content is what is in something. For instance, the content of your question is

I am trying to understand the usage of each word. Is it possible to use any of these words as alternative to the others ?

The content of a can can be pickles.

  • Contest

A contest is a competition, where people submit entries, which are then judged, and then have a winner picked.

  • Context

The context is the surrounding information of something. For example, if I provide a quote, say...

I had an idea that we should serve milk in cups made out of cardboard with holes. It turned out, though, that that was a really bad idea. It made a huge mess.

So of we take a part of that, like

That was a really bad idea.

Then the context would be

I had an idea that we should serve milk in cups made out of cardboard with holes.

None of these words can be used interchangeably.

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As others have noted, these are three entirely different words with entirely different meanings. Your question has been downvoted because a quick check of any dictionary would have showed you this. This kind of question is best resolved using reference materials.

That said, I think you're possibly getting tripped up on the similarity of spelling between these words. Often in English (and possibly other languages) similar spelling can imply some relationship in meaning.

In this case, there is a relationship. All three words use the prefix "con-", which according to the Online Etymology Dictionary is a

word-forming element meaning "together, with," sometimes merely intensive; the form of com- used in Latin before consonants except -b-, -p-, -l-, -m-, or -r-. In native English formations, co- tends to be used where Latin would use con- (e.g. costar).

The same source notes that the origin of "context" is

1375-1425; late Middle English < Latin contextus a joining together, scheme, structure, equivalent to contex (ere) to join by weaving ( con- con- + texere to plait, weave) + -tus suffix of v. action; cf. text

While "contest" originated with

1595-1605; (v.) < Latin contestāri to call to witness (in a lawsuit), equivalent to con- con- + testārī to testify, derivative of testis witness; (noun) derivative of the v., or < French conteste

In summary, all three words do have a similarity of meaning: they all imply that the concept of "with" something, but they are different words with different meanings, and are not interchangeable.

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