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1) We hear a song from our past and are transported back to a memory from long ago, albeit a good or a bad one

the same as

2) We hear a song from our past and we are transported back to a memory from long ago, albeit a good or a bad one

link to the sentence

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    Yes, we is understood to be the subject of are. However, albeit a good or bad one is not right. albeit is synonymous with although (it be) not though it may be. What is expected there is either "a good one" or "a bad one". If you want to leave it open, you can use whether it be or though it may be instead of albeit. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Mar 15 '17 at 14:49
  • Thanks. Can you refer your 'albeit related' answer to this question because it already was asked ell.stackexchange.com/questions/122569/… – Max Mar 15 '17 at 14:50
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Yes, this is an ellipsis and common in English. For example, in my previous sentence I left out "it is" between "and" and "common" because the subject and verb are easily understood from the first part of the sentence.

Other examples:

We went to the store but (we) forgot to buy eggs.

They have baseball practice in the afternoon and (they have) piano lessons in the evening.

Ellipses like these can make your English sound more "fluent" but you have to be careful not to omit too much.

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The use of an ellipsis (the punctuation mark ...) is for when you are quoting a text or speech from someone else and want to shorten the wordage without changing the meaning. If you are writing something from your own mind without quoting anyone, then an ellipsis is not necessary. For example:

  1. Original Quote- "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but if you want to test a man's character, give him power." -Abraham Lincoln
  2. Modified Quote with Ellipsis- "Nearly all men can stand adversity, but ... to test a man's character, give him power." -Abraham Lincoln
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    Yes, that is one definition of "ellipsis" but actually the three dots stand for the general definition which is to represent words which are omitted from what would ordinarily be considered a grammatically or conceptually "complete" sentence. For example, (paraphrasing Orwell), "All animals are equal, but some (animals) are more equal than others" – Andrew Mar 15 '17 at 16:09

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