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I found this sentence in the movie Pulp Fiction:

Then why are you trying to fuck him like a bitch, Brett?

In this case, I consider the Brett is a bitch

like+noun

Then why are you trying to fuck him as a bitch, Brett?

In this case, I consider the Brett is trying to (use) fuck him as a bitch, albeit it sounds weird for me

as+verb ; use as+noun; work as+noun

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    Brett is not the bitch. Marcellus (the person being referred to as "him") is.
    – Catija
    Mar 15, 2017 at 22:58
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    We can discuss taboo language on ELL and EL&U, but the site policy is to remove it from question titles. That helps keep it from popping up on the Hot Network Questions list, among other places.
    – user230
    Mar 15, 2017 at 23:05

1 Answer 1

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It's a general idiomatic expression, "to (verb) like (something)." Some examples from popular music:

Drop it like it's hot

We're going to party like it's 1999

So we put our hands up like the ceiling can't hold us

And many many more. It's pretty common.

In this particular case, Jules is asking Brett why he is treating Marcellus as if Marcellus was his "bitch" (i.e., someone he can do anything he wants to). This use of "bitch" is also pretty common nowadays, but a full explanation of the nuance is not only too much for a quick answer, but also probably beyond me since I'm too old to be aware of the latest slang.

Watch a lot of Tarentino's movies and cable-TV prison dramas, and you should get a pretty good education, though :)

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    (I've got the) Moves Like Jagger is another good example. :-) Mar 16, 2017 at 4:03
  • "Party like a rock ... party like a rock star!"
    – Andrew
    Mar 16, 2017 at 4:37

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