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I have solved that riddle before, so I get half as much credit as you do, for solving it.

I have solved that riddle before, so I get half the credit you do, for solving it.

I have solved that riddle before, so I get half the credit as you do, for solving it.

Are all the above sentences grammatically correct? Do they mean the same thing?

Do we say, "Back in the day, he made half the money I did"? Or, do we say "Back in the day, he made half the money as I did? Or, ".....he made half as much money as I did"?

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The first sentence uses the "as much as" comparative construction correctly. The second is also correct, as it uses "half" as a predeterminer. Predeterminers are adjectives or adjectival phrases that come before determiners (articles, demonstratives, possessives, etc.); some examples are all, what, twice, and both:

I eat all the food.

What a beautiful day!

I pay twice the suggested donation.

Do you want both the desserts?

The third sentence, however, is incorrect. Since "half" modifies "the credit" directly, you can remove it and see if the resulting sentence is grammatically correct:

I have solved that riddle before, so I get the credit as you do, for solving it.

This is pretty obviously weird and incorrect.

Just FYI, the commas at the end of your sentences before "for" don't need to be there.

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