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Here's the sentence about Uber from the Economist magazine:

Its app can summon a car in moments in more than 425 cities around the world, to the fury of taxi drivers everywhere.

Could you explain the part from "to the fury" ? fury means extreme anger, what does “to” mean here?

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Here, the sentence means that the taxi drivers are caused anger and/or impatience whenever they have to report to the taxi summoner wherever they are.

In other words the Uber app is rather irritating for the taxi drivers in 425 countries, as they must report to the people who summon them almost instantly, as they would otherwise face some sort of problems.

Essentially, 'to' means 'causing' here, as in 'causing fury to the taxi drivers'.

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    Actually it's saying that traditional taxi drivers are upset because it takes longer to get a taxi than a to get a ride with Uber through the app, so the taxis are losing business. – ColleenV Mar 23 '17 at 19:08
  • I wouldn't know... The Uber drivers in India are striking for the same reason as I wrote... – AbhigyanC Mar 24 '17 at 0:51
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As a native British English speaker I understand this sentence to mean that taxi drivers who do not drive for Uber are annoyed/frustrated because they are losing business to the Uber taxi drivers because passengers would rather use Uber as they can be summoned much more quickly.

  • I am not an expert on English grammar and have no formal qualifications English. I offer my advice as a native British English speaker. I believe the advice of an untrained English speaker can sometimes be beneficial – RedPython Mar 23 '17 at 18:14
  • That's what translation mean, but how to understand "to" ? – chenlu1902 Mar 24 '17 at 1:18
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    'to the annoyance of' or 'which makes them furious ' , furious = very angry and showing that anger. Think red faced and steam coming out of their ears. – RedPython Mar 24 '17 at 7:39

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