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I have always found prepositions to be a fishy part of grammar in English.

Suppose we have a train, a bus, a car, a plane, a ship, a boat.

We can either say:

  • To get in the train (bus, car, plane, ship, boat).
  • To get into the train (bus, car, plane, ship, boat).
  • To get on the train (bus, car, plane, ship, boat).

But what is the big difference between them.

As I feel it:

  • "in" shows location and firstly means to get inside of them.
  • "into" shows motion rather than the location.
  • "on" means to board. But you cannot board "a car" for instance, so it doesn't always work.
  • @stangdon There's no "into". – SovereignSun Mar 24 '17 at 11:30
  • Into always means "inside". We don't really use it with vehicles. – stangdon Mar 24 '17 at 11:37