2

I always stumble to understand the use of "ARE" as the start of the question.

is this the correct grammar as written below? :

  1. Are you required to hold a work permit in this country?

  2. Are there any water or is there any water?

Normally i would use the word "Do" instead of "are" but i notice more and more application used this phase and some in writing. How do the word "are", in term of grammar, used in such question like the one stated above? or is it even correct?

Thanks

1
  • If you write it as a declarative, it may make sense: "You are required to hold a work permit in the is country". All that happens is the subject "you" and the auxiliary verb "are" are inverted to form the question "Are you required to hold a work permit in this country"? – BillJ Mar 25 '17 at 18:04
2

Are you required to hold a work permit in this country?

In this sentence, are should be used because it agrees with the second person pronoun "You". You only need a do in a question when the sentence lacks of auxliary verb, as in

Statement : You hate me (no auxiliary)

Question : Do you hate me? (do is added)


Are there any water or is there any water?

"Are there any water" is wrong, water is uncountable, so it takes a singular verb.

-1

Water usually doesn't have a definite shape; It merges into one when put in the same container. Grammatically it is one also.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy