4

Let's say your roommate is trying to turn the newly-bought TV on but she can't figure out how to do it. What's the most natural way to ask her to stop so that you can do it instead in order to save time and because you actually know how to, in a friendly way? I know there's a specific phrase native speakers use to put this to word, something like (not sure though):

Never mind I got this. (?)

Any idea?

  • 4
    If you want to be more [jocular, mock] dramatic, you could exclaim Step aside, ma'am! This is a job for Bicycle Repair Man! (It would help if she was a fan of Monty Python! If not, maybe a professional :) – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Mar 25 '17 at 17:08
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    Any of the suggestions you've been given will sound idiomatic; none is guaranteed to come across as completely friendly. The best you can do if you want to minimize the possibility of giving offense is something like let me know if you want me to take a look; I'll be in my room (and then actually walk away and let them work on it alone until/unless they ask for help). – 1006a Mar 25 '17 at 20:24
3

In casual AmE, I got this or I got it are fine.

  1. Here, I got it.
  2. Don't worry about it. I got it.

You can also use

  1. Let me do it.
  2. Let me try it.
  3. I'll get it.

Never mind, I got this doesn't sound quite right. To me, it suggests that you first asked your friend to try, but she's failing, you've given up on her, and now you've changed your mind and you want to try. As far as I can tell, it sounds somewhat rude.

7

A British English speaker would probably say either

Leave it to me

or

I'll take care of that.

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    or, "Please let me (do that)." – WRX Mar 25 '17 at 16:56
3

Assuming that the discussion is going to be quite casual, I would use this-- "Let me have a try"

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