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What's the difference in meaning between two sentences?

  1. None of us knew a thing about driving a horse.

  2. None of us knew about driving a horse.

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1) none of you people had any idea on how to 'ride' a horse. (driving a horse seems wrong to me.)

2) you had to 'ride' a horse (not drive it) at some point of time/some place but you had no idea that you had to do it.

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    Also, drive a horse-drawn carriage.
    – SF.
    Sep 4 '17 at 10:52
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None of us knew a thing about driving a horse.

This is likely equivalent to saying "None of us knew how to drive a horse."

None of us knew about driving a horse.

This is means something close to "None of us knew that the activity of horse driving was expected/desired/involved in regards to something", the "something" defined by context/previous conversation.

The first sentence can also mean this, but would be an emphasized way to express it.

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  • I see. The second one depends on the context. It is a little vague without context. Thank you:)
    – sage
    Mar 27 '17 at 13:10

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