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What the negative past for the modal verb 'have to'?

affirmative sentence (present simple)

He has to do it

negative sentence (present simple)

He doesn't have to do it

positive sentence (past simple)

He had to do it

negative sentence (past simple)

He didn't have to do it - IS IT RIGHT?

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    That's exactly right. You will occasionally encounter older writers treating lexical HAVE as an auxiliary--He hadn't any money, He hadn't to do it--but that's virtually dead today. – StoneyB on hiatus Mar 27 '17 at 22:47
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    And by the way: HAVE in the idiom HAVE to VERB is not a modal verb: modal verb is a technical term which designates the very small class of 'defective' auxiliary verbs which have only two finite forms and no non-finite forms: can/could, may/might, must, shall/should, will/would. – StoneyB on hiatus Mar 28 '17 at 1:38
  • @StoneyB should I name 'have to' as the 'a semimodal verb'? – Max Mar 28 '17 at 5:20
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Yes, that's right. It follows the normal conjugation for "to have".

He couldn't find a date so he had to go to the dance with his sister.
At the last minute he got a date so that he didn't have to go to the dance with his sister.

While they were traveling they had to eat all kinds of unusual things.
While they were traveling they didn't have to eat anything unusual.

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