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Regards.., i would like to discuss about the grammar of the sentences below, and whether they are dependent with their meanings.

The pouring of the garden is a long tradition in the area and can be done to refresh the garden effectively.

The pouring of the garden is a long tradition in the area and can be done to effectively refresh the garden.

The pouring of the garden has a long tradition in the area and can be done to refresh the garden effectively.

These 3 sentences looks logical and correct. ..Thanks.

  • I haven't the least idea what "the pouring of the garden" might mean. But, assuming that it is the name of a tradition, it would not usually have "the" on the front. – Colin Fine May 14 '17 at 20:42
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Not knowing what pouring of the garden is, your last sentence is best

has a long tradition
is a long held tradition

is idiomatic

to refresh the garden effectively

sidesteps the split infinitive in the second sentence.

Though all three sentences would usually be understood to have the same meaning.

  • The split infinitive version here (perhaps ungrammatically) can also mean "in effect", which results in a different meaning for the sentence: "... to, in effect, refresh the garden." This implies the garden is not truly being refreshed, but the effect is similar or the same. How do you know which meaning is intended? You have to go by context, and it may be ambiguous. – Stew C Mar 17 '18 at 0:38

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