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Is "in doing so" a fixed phrase or can it be changed? Are any of the following sentences possible?

  • You shouldn't need to have killed that person while being in that time, because of doing so you changed the present.
  • You shouldn't need to have killed that person while being in that time, doing so you changed the present.
  • You shouldn't need to have killed that person while being in that time, upon doing so you changed the present.
  • You shouldn't need to have killed that person while being in that time, with doing so you changed the present.
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    Technically, none of those is a correct sentence, nor would they be correct with "in doing so", because they're comma splices. You can't just ram together two sentences without a conjunction or at least a semicolon. Some of them would be correct if you just put "because" in between the two parts.
    – stangdon
    Commented Mar 29, 2017 at 18:04
  • Yes, "doing so" can take various prepositions like in, upon, on, while, before, after, etc. Also "by" but not "with". If standing alone, it usually implies a preposition like "by". However as stangdon points out your examples are not grammatically correct since you need to connect them as you would separate sentences, with a conjunction or appropriate punctuation.
    – Andrew
    Commented Mar 29, 2017 at 18:05

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I don't know what you mean when you ask whether "in doing so" is a fixed phrase or can be changed. However, while none of your examples above are totally correct sentences, here's a correct alternative:

You shouldn't have killed that person while in that time; in doing so, you changed the present.

It can also be two sentences.

You shouldn't have killed that person while in that time. In doing so, you changed the present.

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