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Why the word being is included in this sentence “she eliminated her without a second thought as not being to her husband's taste”?

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  • Let's say she's talking about Jane. "She eliminated her without a second thought as (her - Jane) not being to her (Speaker's) husband's taste". Does it make more sense now? – Rio1210 Apr 1 '17 at 4:15
  • What's the source of this sentence, is it your own creation? Who is she, her,and whose husband? It can be rephrased as "She eliminated her without a second thought because of her not being to her husband's taste" – mahmud koya Apr 1 '17 at 4:45
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There are two women involved, I'll write her¹ to mean the subject of the main sentence and her² to mean the other woman, the one who is eliminating.

“Not being to her¹ husband's taste” is a description of “her²”. The complement “… as not being …” gives the reason for eliminating her².

The sentence could also be written “She¹ eliminated her² without a second thought because she¹ decided that she² was not to her¹ husband's taste”, except that there is a collision of referents for “she”, so an alternative description would have to be used for at least one of the women (e.g. “She eliminated Alice without a second thought because she¹ decided that Alice was not to her¹ husband's taste”). The construction with a present participle is more direct and is not ambiguous.

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