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What is the meaning of "raised to some power" in the following sentence?

In its most simple and basic form, a moment is the product of the distance to some point, raised to some power, multiplied by some physical quantity such as the force, charge, etc. at that point

Does "raised to some power" mean "after we apply some force to some point"? In this sentence, is some force a charge, a force?

If a comma appears in the middle (for example, ", raised to some power," ), is it a representation of the conjunction and subject omitted?

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When you raise something to some power, you are performing exponentiation. In other words, raising x to the power k is simply xk.

I assume that your excerpt comes from this article on moment. In the article, they call r the "distance to some point". They let n denote some power. Then again, that distance r raised to some power n is rn.

In the product of the distance to some point, raised to some power, multiplied by some physical quantity, "raised to some power" refers to "the distance to some point". The product is between that value rn and some physical quantity that they call Q. That Q includes force, charge, etc. The final product is rnQ.

  • Yes. My excerpt comes from the wikipedia article on 'Moment (physics)' – user22046 Apr 3 '17 at 2:32
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You ask:

If a comma appears in the middle ... is it a representation of the conjunction and subject omitted?

To augment Max's answer:

"a moment is ... the distance to some point....raised to some power".

is analogous to

Tandoori chicken is marinated chicken cooked in a clay oven.

The phrase in bold is headed by an adjective formed from the past participle, expressing what has been done to (the thing represented in) the preceding noun phrase, to put it in its current state:

the distance to some point raised to some power

marinated chicken cooked in a clay oven

A "sub" in football is a player taken off the bench and sent into the game for another player, who comes out of the game.

A "meringue" is a mixture of egg whites and sugar whipped until stiff.

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