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If the following is our main sentence:(Parallelism)

Before the judge announced the punishment, he asked the murderer if he wanted to speak either to the victim’s family, or to the jury.

Can we rewrite as following( in the way keep the parallelism as well)?

Before the judge announced the punishment, he asked the murderer if he wanted to speak to either the victim’s family, or the jury.

Again, if the following is our main sentence:(Parallelism)

Air pollution may come either from the ocean as natural contaminants given off by sea life or from the internal combustion engines of automobile.

Can we rewrite as following( in the way keep the parallelism as well)?

Air pollution may come from either the ocean as natural contaminants given off by sea life or the internal combustion engines of automobile.

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    Both forms are considered grammatical. To mark the parallelism more clearly, I tend to repeat the preposition. It's a stylistic choice. But I would do either from x ....or from Y versus "from either X or from Y". – Tᴚoɯɐuo Apr 3 '17 at 15:41
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The short answer is "yes", and you seem to also understand how to maintain parallelism by repeating prepositions where appropriate. The only minor edit I suggest is:

(The judge) asked ... if he wanted to speak to either the victim's family, or to the jury.

The second "to" isn't necessary but it does make the sentence flow better.

Another example

I'm planning either to go to the mountains or to go to the beach.
I'm planning to either go to the mountains or (to) the beach.

  • "The second "to" isn't necessary but it does make the sentence flow better." If I do that then parallelism doesn't make sense as we have one side "either + noun phrase" and the other side "or +to +noun " which is prepositional phrase which seems to be wrong and it is not a parallel structure on both side of correlative. – Mickey Mouse Apr 3 '17 at 15:54
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    @MickeyMouse I agree that it's not strict "parallelism", but as with any language, beyond simple grammar there is good writing: whether the sentence sounds good and is easy to understand. There's something about "the victim's family or the jury" that doesn't quite sound right to my ear, possibly because of the context. – Andrew Apr 3 '17 at 16:13

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