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Could anyone please help me? I'm not sure which sentence is correct to write:

"The question is what are my chances to break even"

or

"The question is what my chances to break even are"

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    Is that the entire sentence? Please include sufficient explanation and context so that we can help you. There are often times where what you're asking for isn't obvious without them so we could potentially give you incorrect information. – Catija Apr 3 '17 at 20:04
  • The question is rather what are (?) our chances to even remotely break even. – Mary Brook Apr 3 '17 at 20:06
  • Please include this information in the question. Having it here in comments isn't useful. – Catija Apr 3 '17 at 20:06
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    Welcome to ELL! I added some formatting to make your question a little bit clearer. It is always helpful to add as much detail as possible. For example, Why are you asking (are you writing something or did you read something, for example)? Which do you think might be correct? – ColleenV Apr 3 '17 at 20:16
  • Punctuation needs to be added to the examples. – user3169 Apr 3 '17 at 20:28
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In the first case there's a comma missing, in the second case you put a linking verb at the end of a sentence. The latter is not incorrect but it sounds forced and it's unnecessary. As William Safire wrote "If any word is improper at the end of a sentence, a linking verb is."
I'd recommend the forms

The question is what my chances are to break even.
The question is, what are my chances to break even?

The first is a statement, the second is a question. Of course if you want to go with

The question is what my chances to break even are.

you can, it is technically correct and formal.
Now, in the second case the sentence fragment "what are my chances to break even" is a question in itself, so using it with "The question is" is informal, especially in writing, and it may be considered incorrect by some. It's fine most of the time, especially in the US, but if you want to go formal for certain, I'd recommend breaking it into a statement and a question, something like

The question is simple. What are my chances to break even?

You can also use a colon

The question is simple: What are my chances to break even?

But be careful with that, you can't use a colon after an incomplete sentence, so

The question is: What are my chances to break even?

is incorrect, although in speech there's no difference between this and my second recommended sentence.

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The question is, "What are my chances to break even?"

The question is what my chances to break even are.

In the first version, you are repeating the question verbatim. In the second version, you are reporting the gist of the question, restating it, not quoting it verbatim.

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