Organizational consultants call it disruption. Trump sometimes hints that it is little more than good fun. He has called the Roosevelt Room, across the hall from his private office, a "boardroom," as though it were just another television set where he could go around the table to tell those who fall on his bad side that they're fired. If Flynn's ouster is a script, we should expect the biggest dismissals to take place face-to-face in the Oval Office.

That constant fear of being fired has been paralyzing the White House, let alone the dozens of agencies and departments that make up the vast federal bureaucracy. Many senior-level aides spend a large amount of time anticipating what Trump might seize on. The President is a transactional leader. He looks for advantage in each situation, and the people in the room invariably change his outlook. Far more than most leaders, with set ideas and ideologies, he is often swayed by the person with whom he speaks last. Face time is power.

:The source of the question

  1. If Flynn's ouster is a script, we should expect the biggest dismissals to take place face-to-face in the Oval Office.
    → If Flynn's dismissal is intended, then we should predict such things happen in person in the Oval Office.

  2. Many senior-level aides spend a large amount of time anticipating what Trump might seize on. The President is a transactional leader.
    → Senior aides are forced to anticipate his (Trump's) next moves so that they can prevent him from taking advantage to fire themselves. He is strict as far as give and take are concerned

  3. He looks for advantage in each situation, and the people in the room invariably change his outlook.
    → People in the room constantly influence his mind in the way to prevent their dismissals.

  4. Far more than most leaders, with set ideas and ideologies, he is often swayed by the person with whom he speaks last.
    → He is often influenced by the people he last encountered. And they (the people) plan ideas and ideologies to influence him before the meet.

:The bold parts are the paraphrase I'm especially concerned and made to ask if it is done correctly.

The link: Inside Donald Trump's White House Chaos

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50
  1. If Flynn's dismissal is a script (scripted; planned like a script) , then we should expect the biggest dismissals to take place in person in the Oval Office.
    (This is an allusion to Trump's show The Apprentice. It suggests that there will be bigger dismissals—more drama—in the future.)
    • sieze on To take notice of something, especially because it can be used to one's advantage: The newspapers seized on the mayor's foolish remark and said that he wasn't fit for the job. (The Free Dictionary)

      Many senior-level aides spend a large amount of time anticipating what Trump might notice and use to his advantage.
      (This does not specifically suggest that he is targeting the aides and their jobs.)

    • He is strict as far as give and take are concerned.

      (I think you have the right idea here. In other words, he does not do favors because he is generous. He wants something in return.)

  2. People in the room constantly influence his mind in the way to prevent their dismissals about what he will use to his advantage next (his prospects).
    (Again, he is not necessarily targeting anyone's job.)
  3. He (Trump) is often swayed by the person with whom he speaks last. This (= being swayed) happens more often with Trump than with most leaders, who have set (= fixed, unchanging) ideas and ideologies.

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