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He left the party because he was supposedly ill, but really he didn't want to be there.

He left the party because supposedly he was ill, but really he didn't want to be there.

He left the party supposedly because he was ill, but really he didn't want to be there.

Supposedly could be placed in one of three or four positions in the first part of the sentence, so I am not sure where best to place it.

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  • The third one is slightly accusatory as if you don't believe him. The second one, while not incorrect, is the most awkward because it interrupts your flow a little bit. The first one is the most "objective," that is, it imparts no judgment and is (almost) a mere statement of fact. By the way, the second one would need commas around "supposedly." – Teacher KSHuang Apr 7 '17 at 12:12
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Use:

He left the party because he was supposedly ill, but really he didn't want to be there.

supposed as used here means:

adjective 1. (prenominal) presumed to be true without certain knowledge

In your example, the presumed information is the illness. While you could move supposedly around, it would be more understandable (esp. in speech) to put it directly before what it is modifying.

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