0

This question already has an answer here:

Question:

Which option is right. In case if both are right- for which case the using is more appropriate or I can use them interchangeably in some cases?

.

1) IN or/and FOR

  1. I haven't seen him in a few years

  2. I haven't seen him for a few years

2) IN or/and FOR

  1. I haven't seen him in a seven years

  2. I haven't seen him for a seven years

marked as duplicate by Brian Tompsett - 汤莱恩, Glorfindel, stangdon, Adam, Nathan Tuggy Apr 7 '17 at 22:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 1
    Personally, I think They have not worked in years sounds a bit "quaint, folksy", but it's been gaining traction in recent decades. Bottom line - it's always at least possible to use for, but in doesn't work at all in non-negated contexts such as He's been seeing her once a week for years. – FumbleFingers Apr 7 '17 at 14:32
  • @stangdon Thanks for your concern. Pretty close but I want to know if I can use them interchangeably in some cases – Max Apr 7 '17 at 15:09
1

Both of these are correct and interchangeable:

I haven't seen him in a few years. I haven't seen him for a few years.

The article 'a' is not correct in these sentences:

I haven't seen him in a seven years I haven't seen him for a seven years

'A few' is an idiom, unlike 'seven', which is a precise number of years and doesn't require the article.

The following sentences are correct:

I haven't seen him in seven years. I haven't seen him for seven years.

Personally, I prefer "in a" in these scenarios but there is nothing wrong with "for a".

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.