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I read a paragraph that said:

The first thing you notice when she walks into a room is how tall she is, six feet in flats.

What does "in flats" mean? Would it have the same meaning if "in flats" was deleted (i.e. it just read "She is six feet.")?

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    'In flat shoes'. The meaning would not be fundamentally changed if you missed it out, but the emphasis would be reduced. Similar to saying someone was 'six foot in his stocking soles' or 'in his stocking(ed) feet' – Spagirl Apr 3 '17 at 10:45
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    Wouldn't this one be better off in ell? – Mr Lister Apr 3 '17 at 11:07
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    @MrLister if you want to replace feet by a more convenient unit, I would not propose the ell! – oerkelens Apr 3 '17 at 13:29
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As used in the sentence flats are a type of (usually) women's shoes that don't have high heels, and are thus "flat".

The expression "six feet in flats" means that the person is very tall, even when wearing flat shoes (ie, even when their height is not exaggerated by heels).

Will it be same if "in flat" was deleted ?Just say"She is six feet".

Removing the expression "in flats" will take away from the intention of the phrase - which is to say that she was unusually tall.

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    "She is six feet" isn't idiomatic in British English. You could say "She is six feet tall", but the OP's sentence has already used the word "tall" and it would be clumsy to repeat it. – alephzero Apr 3 '17 at 12:24
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    "She is six foot" is perhaps more idiomatic in British English. – The Cat Apr 3 '17 at 12:34
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    @TheCat among tall women I've known, 5 11¾ is quite common. – Chris H Apr 3 '17 at 13:17
  • Thank you! Mr. Khalid, I got the meaning. I am very happy as I am a new member here . – Janet Apr 3 '17 at 14:27
  • Correct, and worth noting that the opposite would be "in heels", meaning she's wearing high-heeled shoes, increasing her apparent height. – AJFaraday Apr 3 '17 at 15:51

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