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If I am somewhere on behalf of someone or to represent someone which way is best to say it in formal English?

  • I'm here in the name of Daniel Swift.
  • I'm here in Daniel Swift's name.
  • I'm here under Daniel Swift's name.

Is there a difference between the three?

Is it better to say:

  • I'm here to represent Daniel Swift.
  • I'm here on behalf of Daniel Swift.
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  • it's all about context. A lawyer might say represent but a friend or colleague would probably not. In a real situation, you would probably start of by saying what you want to do, then refer Daniel Swift using the appropriate preposition. For example, "I'm here to check the artwork that you are doing for Daniel Swift" or "I'm here to drop off an order from Daniel Swift". If it's anything more complicated than this, you would probably need a letter of representation or even a power of attorney, and that will explain exactly what you are authorised to do, for whom. – JavaLatte Apr 12 '17 at 13:47
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The correct way to express this situation is

I'm here on behalf of Daniel Swift.
I'm here to represent Daniel Swift.
I'm here representing Daniel Swift.
I'm here in place of Daniel Swift.
I'm here as proxy for Daniel Swift.
I'm here substituting for Daniel Swift.

Usually the phrase

in the name of

is not used, since you are representing the person and not just their name.

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