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Context : form referencing our customers experiences

While the overall goal is crystal clear (describe our experiences, what we did, solutions used, problems solved...), I got a couple fields I don't really understand.


Customer Engagement Title
I'm not sure whether it's about the nature of our relationship with this client, the client itself, his level of involvement in the design of the solution, or something else.

In my case, We developped and deployed a website/software, and had to communicate a lot with our client (with validation cycles and so on). Is that what I should be speaking about ? I wouldn't call us "partners", but guess I could find a word for that, since the field asks for a "title"

I checked out Google and Wikipedia btw, but it wasn't enough this time.


Customer Engagement Short Description (300 Chars)
If I got the 1st field right, I guess I should just tell about the work we did together.
Is that it, or am I completely wrong ?


EDIT : Got precisions : in that specific case, one should just read this as "project title" and "project description". The guy whom I talked to confirmed me a lot of people get confused with those fields.

Form's overview

  • Try asking for the instructions, or failing that, a sample form that has been filled 'correctly'. From the context, it looks like your circled fields are a matched pair that asks for (1) the title you want to give to your 'short description'; and (2) the 'short description' itself. However, it could conceivably be asking for the role or position of either the customer or the person filling out the form. Best to check with whoever designed (or whoever now administers) the form. – Lawrence Apr 12 '17 at 16:05
  • Welcome to ELL, Balmipour. I can see that "Customer Engagement Title" is pretty confusing. It would help if you could explain a little about the organizations involved here. What is the role of your organization in this? Is your organization the client, or the service provider? What organization has prepared the form? The client, your company or some other organization? – JavaLatte Apr 12 '17 at 16:06
  • perhaps it means preffered address? This customer prefers Mrs. to Ms. So the entry would say: Mrs. Smith. Or they have a tile other than Mr. or Ma'am. Doctor, Reverend, Sir Thomas, and so on... – WRX Apr 12 '17 at 16:24
  • @JavaLatte Glad to see I'm not he only one confused here :p Well, it's a form for "Amazon parter program", where we have to describe the projects conducted, services used, and other things like this. In short : We use Amazon (AWS) as a service provider. We provide IT services to customers, for which we often use AWS's technology, since it makes things easier for us, and our customers. The form I'm filling is focused on telling to Amazon that we worked with customers X or Y, and give details about the projects. The goal will be to become partners. – Balmipour Apr 12 '17 at 16:29
  • @Lawrence See what I answered to Javalatte. Basically, I'm not sure asking to their support would be a great idea, but if it's really that complex, I could try. I didn't think to it, but I could also try looking for experiences of official partners, since some have to be made publicly available, and if I'm lucky enough, the answer to those precise questions will be clearly available. Gotta try this approach, and update if I find something. Thanks. – Balmipour Apr 12 '17 at 16:35
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It looks like you are dealing with a form designed by or close to someone who also designed the database backing it.

So I would bet the internal database has columns titled exactly what the fields are titled, and the form designer didn't have a lot of imagination, instruction, or experience in making user-friendly forms.

"Customer Engagement Title" sounds like it would be the name of the "incident" or customer experience. What it sounds like to me is that they want you to treat the customer experience as a story - so if you had to write a book or article about your customer experience, what title would you give it?

The "Customer Engagement Short Description" would be like a small blurb on the back of that book. As though you were writing a description for this story on a website where people could buy it.

Check with your employer but I would assume you could be creative and have fun with these fields.

  • I got a phone call with our Partner Development Representative, and he confirmed me this term confuses a lot of people. Sounds more like marketing than anything else to me. We should actually read those fields as "Project title" and "Project description". I was quite sure you got it right when you said they want to make a story of it. On the other hand, and despite my extreme love for "creativity", be sure I would NOT have fun with such fields. – Balmipour Apr 13 '17 at 10:22

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