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I was just wondering if it is okay to use "because although" in the middle of a sentence. How does this sentence look? Should I remove the comma after self-confidence or any other suggestions?

It is important to have a more detailed understanding of the social factors that hinder adolescents' self-confidence, because although the life stage is short in comparison to childhood, the bullying experienced by teenagers during this crucial stage of development has been identified as being particularly damaging.

I can see the argument for splitting this into two separate sentences, but I really need to link them together with the use of "as" or "because" somehow.

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    I think it is fine and it is used not infrequently. You will find it punctuated in various ways: ...self-confidence because, although... or self-confidence, because, although ... or self-confidence because although... – Tᴚoɯɐuo Apr 14 '17 at 19:21
  • Try moving the comma from before because to after and see if it reads more smoothly for you. ETA also the second way @TRomano lists. – 1006a Apr 14 '17 at 19:22
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    You could also write: It is important to have a more detailed understanding of the social factors that hinder adolescents' self-confidence, as the bullying experienced by teenagers during this crucial stage of development is particularly damaging despite the brevity of adolescence in comparison to childhood. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Apr 14 '17 at 19:26
  • Not sure what you gain by has been identified as being instead of is. Show some confidence! :) – Tᴚoɯɐuo Apr 14 '17 at 19:29
  • It's for an academic essay, so I have references at the end of the sentence in my Word document! :) – user53817 Apr 14 '17 at 19:31
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It doesn't sound wrong at all.

Still, although opposes the aforementioned clauses (hence all-though) and serves to reinforce an idea. Although, it's use in place of "despite of" strikes me as colloquial. I would suggest to remove the clause for sake of brevity, because the mere contrast should be obvious from the context.

"short but crucial" would move the precedent much closer to the antecedent. However "shorter than childhood" doesn't fit in so well, and you might feel the need to directly emphasize the contrast, so the original sentence seems fine.

If "the damage" is put into perspective in elaborate context, that would usually come at a later section in the paper.

If the short time is indeed intended to be highlighted, the sub-clause might be appropriate. However, that emphasis might indicate other factors. Between "short and crucial" or "short but crucial", neither seems preferable to me.

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While I don't believe this is technically incorrect, it does sound clunky.

What about removing the "Although" and reworking the remaining sentence to account for the same meaning?

"It is important to have a more detailed understanding of the social factors that hinder adolescents' self-confidence, because the adolescent life stage is short in comparison to childhood, which makes bullying experienced by teenagers during this crucial stage of development, particularly damaging."

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