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Have you ever seen any person who went school the day after his or her parent's wedding party?

The sentence above is a translation of a part of a dialog in a movie. Is translation above standard? To edit it, I have suggestions below. Do they make sense? Since I am not native English speaker, so I may compare tenses with my mother tongue language and I may face some problems in communications.

Suggestions:

  1. Have you ever seen any person who goes school the day after his or her parent's wedding party?[Not Suggested]

  2. Have you ever seen any person who has gone school the day after his or her parent's wedding party?[Highly suggested]

  3. Have you ever seen any person who might have gone school the day after his or her parent's wedding party?[Not Suggested]
1

First we say go to school. The to is required before school in all four of your sentences.

If you insert the to in your first sentence, then it is grammatically correct. It is also the most idiomatic of your sentences, as far as the choice of verb tense. You are talking in general terms.

Have you ever seen any person who went to school the day after his or her parent's wedding party?

Notice, I didn't change went to anything else as it is correct and idiomatic, at least in American English. However, it is even more idiomatic to use some different vocabulary and say something such as this:

Have you ever met/known anyone/anybody who went to school the day after his or her parent's wedding party?

And, in addition, in the USA we would most likely say wedding reception, because this is the celebration or "party" after a wedding.

As for your suggestions, keeping in mind that you need to insert to before school...

1 (present simple) is okay, but not as natural or common as using the past simple. The present simple makes the action of to go more vivid. But it would be unusual to say.

2 (present perfect) To me, this is even less common than #1, and probably rare, especially in American English. Speakers of British English may use the present perfect in this context.

3 is grammatical but is "not suggested", because the chances of a native speaker saying this are minimal, at least in American English.

1

Be careful! For a person to go to his/her parent's wedding party, it could be a case of an adopted child or a second marriage for that (one) parent! For a person to go to his/her parents' wedding party, that person could have been born/adopted before his/her (two) parents were married.

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