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I hope to understand the difference between the following phrases in bold:

Public outrage over David Dao being forcibly removed from flight strengthens potential lawsuit on personal injury or contract claims

Public outrage over David Dao who was forcibly removed from flight strengthens potential lawsuit on personal injury or contract claims

To me, I cannot tell which one is better. Could you explain the difference here?

Thank you so much.

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Apr 15 '17 at 13:55

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    The title doesn't really reflect the content. Where is the which is in the question body? Did you mean who was? – Mari-Lou A Apr 13 '17 at 21:59
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“David Dao[’s] being forcibly removed…” means that the outrage was over the removal. That is, it’s the same as “public outrage over the forcible removal of David Dao”.

“David Dao[,] who was forcibly removed…” would mean that the outrage was over Mr. Dao. It still makes some sense: people could be outraged over “Mr. Dao” in the metaphorical sense of “the case of Mr. Dao”, but it’s somewhat awkward.

I would use being.

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