2

I know that "These" can only be followed by plural nouns.
ex: These flowers are beautiful.

My questions are:

  1. Can I use multiple uncountable nouns after "These"?
    ex: These milk, butter, and bread are beyond their sell-by dates.
  2. Can I mention uncountable nouns together with countable ones after "These"?
    ex: These evidence and witnesses prove him guilty.
1

If you're using demonstrative adjectives with a list, you should use one for each item in the list. See more on "demonstrative adjectives" on this page.

This milk, this butter, and this bread are beyond their sell-by dates.

Even though those nouns are uncountable, you use "this" and not "these," because uncountable nouns are generally treated as singular. See here for more information on that subject.

In your second example, one item is singular (uncountable and treated as singular) and one is plural, so you would use different demonstrative adjectives for each:

This evidence and these witnesses prove him guilty.

Using a demonstrative adjective is only necessary to point to which objects you're talking about. In most cases, you could avoid this problem by simply using an article like "the."

The milk, butter, and bread are beyond their sell-by dates. The evidence and witnesses prove him guilty.

-1

I don't think people would say or write this. I would expect something like:

These things, the milk, butter, and bread are beyond their sell-by dates.

Your other example might simply be:

These points, the evidence and witnesses prove him guilty.

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