1

Are all of the following sentences correct?

  1. New York is a city to which I have traveled many times.
  2. New York is a city which I have traveled to many times (not "many times to"?).
  3. This is the problem for which there is no perfect solution.
  4. This is the problem which there is no perfect solution for.

I used to think in adjective clauses with prepositions such as "which", "whom" we can put the preposition only before them.

All of the items are from the keys. The original task is to fill tha gaps (there might be several correct answers):

  1. New York is a city _ which I have traveled _ many times. (to)
  2. This is the problem _ which there is no perfect solution _. (for)
  • 1
    Place the preposition before the relative pronoun and everything will be fine! – SovereignSun Apr 17 '17 at 12:57
  • 1
    Off topic, but "which" sets off a non-restrictive clause; that is, one that adds supplementary information without changing the meaning of the sentence. Since "New York is a city" would be a very different sentence, you want to use "that": "New York is a city that I have traveled to many times." For some reason, though, you never say "to that"; even restrictively, you say "to which", "New York is a city to which I have traveled." (Unless you are using "that" as an article, "I am going to that city.") – Malvolio Apr 17 '17 at 17:01
1
  1. New York is a city to which I have traveled many times. (Formal, correct)
  2. New York is a city which I have traveled to many times (Correct)
  3. This is the problem for which there is no perfect solution. (Formal, correct)
  4. This is the problem which there is no perfect solution for. (Sounds uncommon)

I would use "to" instead of "for":

  • This is the problem to which there is no perfect solution.
  • 1
    I agree that "a solution to a problem" is better than "for a problem". I don't know why you say (4) is incorrect unless you are applying a "no preposition at the end of sentences" rule. As Churchill is reputed to have said, "that is the kind of pedantry up with which I will not put." – James K Apr 17 '17 at 15:16
  • 1
    I need to find a source, but with "for" i remember placing it at the end is incorrect. Uou can place prepositions at the end of a sentence. – SovereignSun Apr 17 '17 at 15:51
  • 2
    The word "for" is used as a preposition here. Questions, sentences with relative clauses or in the passive commonly end in a preposition. That is part of standard English grammar en.oxforddictionaries.com/grammar/… gives example "What did you put that there for?" – James K Apr 17 '17 at 17:03

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.