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Does this sentence mean "U.S. banks seem to be clearly ending with the eight-year crisis cycle or ending with rebuilding cycle" OR "U.S. banks seem to be clearly ending with the eight-year crisis cycle or U.S. banks seem to be clearly rebuilding cycle"?

"When we look at the general landscape, I would say U.S. banks seem to be clearly ending with the eight-year crisis cycle or rebuilding cycle. We've seen signs that U.S. banks are truly turning the page," David Benamou, managing partner at Axiom Alternative Investments, told CNBC on Tuesday.

Source: http://www.cnbc.com/2017/04/18/us-banks-are-now-truly-turning-the-page-asset-manager-says.html

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When we look at the general landscape, I would say U.S. banks seem to be clearly ending with the eight-year crisis cycle or rebuilding cycle.

Here, in your example, applies the definition #2 of or from TFD:

or:

  1. Used to indicate a synonymous or equivalent expression: acrophobia, or fear of great heights.

Consequently the eight-year crisis cycle is the same as rebuilding cycle.

  • As a side note, this use of ending with sounds odd to me. The complement of end with is a result. "Some marriages end with divorce". The collocation is a variant of end in. Here, however, it is used to mean "are parting ways with {something}". If this is a common use, I have never seen it before, though I've heard ending it with {someone} many times, as it is a common idiom. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Apr 18 '17 at 12:09
  • I see, I think I'm getting your point, @TRomano. – Lucian Sava Apr 18 '17 at 12:17
  • @TRomano something like "the reign of X bank seems to be clearly ending with ..." would work, though I agree that this instance sounds weird. – Stephen S Apr 18 '17 at 20:16

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