3
  • He has come a minute ago,
  • I have had my breakfast a few moments ago,
  • The train has left the station not long ago.

Do we use time markers like "a minute ago", "a few minutes ago", "not long ago" with present perfect? And what is the difference between "a few MOMENTS ago" and "a few MINUTES ago" and are these definite time markers? If so why can we use these with present perfect tense? And could we use "He has left just a few moments ago or a few minutes ago."?

1

He has come a minute ago.

He came a minute ago.

I would usually want more information (this above sentence is grammatical but sounds incomplete) - He came here a minute ago.

I have had my breakfast a few moments ago.

I had my breakfast a few moments ago.

The train has left the station not long ago.

The train left the station not long ago.

Do we use time markers like "a minute ago", "a few minutes ago", "not long ago" with present perfect?

I'm not too good with tenses, sorry, so I have to intuit this, but from the above corrections, it appears not. I believe you would usually just use the past simple.

And what is the difference between "a few MOMENTS ago" and "a few MINUTES ago" and are these definite time markers?

As far as I know there is no difference from a grammatical point of view.

If so why can we use these with present perfect tense?

As far as I know you can't.

And could we use "He has left just a few moments ago or a few minutes ago."?

You would use "He left just a few moments/few minutes ago."

0

The present perfect is a tense that, among other things, connects the actions done in the past with the doer of said actions in the present. Outwardly saying the time that the action was completed creates, at least for me, a disconnection between the action and the doer, and so the present perfect sounds wrong. In all your examples, native English speakers would just use the simple past.

Also, "a few moments ago" references a time much closer to the present time than "a few minutes ago" does.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.