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Please take a look at this sentence

Linking verbs show a relationship between the subject and a noun or adverb being linked to it.

I want to understand the word being. I think it is not passive voice, because then there should be any "be" form (is, am, are) before it.

And I think without "being" the sentence is still correct.

Linking verbs show a relationship between the subject and a noun or adverb linked to it.

Can someone please explain why and in which context being is being used here?

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Contrary to your first instinct, it may indeed be a passive construction inside a relative clause:

Linking verbs show a relationship between the subject and a noun or adverb that is being linked to it.

There you have your form of be. Now this relative clause is shortened to a participle clause:

Linking verbs show a relationship between the subject and a noun or adverb that is being linked to it.

  • Maybe you are right.But Why do we need to use "being" here? . Doesn't "that is linked" is more appropriate here. – beginner Apr 20 '17 at 17:06
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    @beginner - You certainly could say "that is linked" instead. The phrasing with "being linked" emphasizes the action rather than the state, though. – stangdon Apr 20 '17 at 18:49
  • Yeah "linked" feels more general(for always). "being linked" seems like we are using it for current scenario. Thanks, I think i got it. – beginner Apr 21 '17 at 10:28

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