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Sentence:

It might be the worst thing you will have ever heard (I anticipate that his experience of listening to some tunes in the future might be the worst thing that he have ever heard)

Can I ask the question about the future experience in this way?

  • But there's no sample question...? – Johns-305 Apr 20 '17 at 21:37
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    My inclination is to say no, because when you hear it, you will say "That is the worst thing I have ever heard." Right now, it will be the worst thing you have ever heard. But I agree that it is a tricky situation. – stangdon Apr 20 '17 at 21:39
  • @boatseller - I just edited the post to (I hope) make it a little more clear. – stangdon Apr 20 '17 at 21:39
  • @stangdon But OP is asking about a question and there's no question in the post. – Johns-305 Apr 20 '17 at 22:50
  • @boatseller I've just corrected. Sorry, it is my fault – Max Apr 20 '17 at 23:04
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Yes, this is acceptable. It is a form of the future perfect simple construction. Follow the link for more information on that type of phrase.

Because the listening is going to occur in the future, you use "will." By that time, it will be the worst thing you "have heard," with the modifying adverb "ever."

If you leave out "will," it's unclear that the listening will take place in the future:

It might be the worst thing you have ever heard.

That could mean that "you" have already done the listening.

There is one side-note, which is that as constructed, the sentence implies that it might be the worst thing you have heard up to that point. If you want to say that it might be the worst thing the person will ever hear in their entire life, you could say:

It might be the worst thing you will ever hear.

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