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This is from Longman Dictionary

An action is aimed at doing something:

Our policies are aimed at encouraging economic growth.

Don’t say: Our policies are aimed to encourage economic growth.

Then am I wrong to write the below?

The goals of the treatment are aimed to reduce pain and inflammation.

These measures are aimed to reduce unemployment by 50 %

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    The goals of the treatment are aimed... The goal is what is aimed at. The goals themselves are not aimed. The arrow is aimed at the target. The target is aimed at. The football player aims at the goal when he kicks the ball. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Apr 21 '17 at 21:31
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While people will understand your example sentences, it is not the way they would normally be put together. To correct it you could say it this way:

The treatment is aimed at reducing pain and inflammation.

These measures are aimed at reducing unemployment by 50%.

Notice I removed "goals of" because it is implied by the aiming. In both of these, the structure is "is/are aimed at -ing".

Another way to phrase it would be

Our aim with the treatment is to reduce pain and inflammation.

In this case, 'aim' becomes a noun, and is used as a direct synonym of 'goal'.

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The OED would appear to confirm that the transitive verb aim, whilst it normally, in various senses, takes the preposition at, can take for ("He aimed for glory")

It can also take the infinitive as it does in your later examples - e.g. "We aim to please".

I see nothing wrong with saying "Our policies are aimed to encourage economic growth", though it might be slightly more usual to say "...aimed at encouraging economic growth".

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