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  1. The children learn a new language much easier than adults.

  2. The children learn a new language more easily than adults.

I think 2 is right because easy modifies the verb, so it needs to be written in adverb forms, doesn't it?

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You are correct that "easy" is modifying the verb and therefore the adverb form "more easily" is appropriate here.

However, there are other errors in your sentence. When talking in the abstract we use plurals with no articles. You correctly used "adults" but it should be "children" rather than "the children" and "languages" rather than "a language".

Therefore your sentence should read:

Children learn new languages more easily than adults.

  • Thanks a lot! I could learn more as an EFL english learner. – L.Day Apr 21 '17 at 12:06
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The children learn a new language more easily than adults.

In this sentence, "easily" is used as an adverb, as it modifies the verb "learn".

The children learn a new language much easier than adults.

In this sentence, "easier" is used as a comparative adverb. So, as far as "more easily" or "much easier" is concerned, both of the sentences use them correctly.

For more information on comparative adverbs, refer to Comparative and Superlative Adverbs on the Oxford Dictionary website.

  • Thanks a lot! but easier is the form of adjective easy. Is it okay ? I think there is no element which the adjective easy modifies... – L.Day Apr 21 '17 at 12:06
  • You did not understand my answer. "Easier" can be used both as a comparative adjective (what you are referring to in your above comment) and a comparative adverb (the form in which it is used in the first sentence in the question). So, both of your sentences are correct. – satnam Apr 21 '17 at 12:20

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