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What is the part of speech of the 'experienced' in the following text? Can you please explain the grammatical structure of the sentence that contains this word?

Market research is a vital part of the planning of any business. However experienced you or your staff may be in a particular field, if you are thinking of introducing a service to a new area, it is important to find out what the local population thinks about it first.

  • I think it's a fronted complement. "You or your staff may be experienced in.. ". – user178049 Apr 23 '17 at 8:15
  • Native English speakers do not say may you...? to make a request. Use could you...? (or would you...?; or even will you...?; note might you...? is possible but rare. But never may you...?) – green_ideas Apr 23 '17 at 15:13
  • however means no matter how here. – iBug Aug 17 '19 at 11:36
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"However experienced you or your staff may be in a particular field" is equal to "No matter how experienced you or your staff may be in a particular field", meaning you or your staff should not have too much confidence in your experience or knowledge. "experienced" is used as an adjective here.

Quoting the definition of "however" from Collins English Dictionary:

You use however before an adjective or adverb to emphasize that the degree or extent of something cannot change a situation. Example: You should always strive to achieve more, however well you have done before.

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