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I don't know how to ask a question about why there are so many people in a place.

For ex: You are student of a university. Normally, each class of your university only has 20 students. However, today, when you go to your class, there are about 30 students. You want to ask your friend sitting next to you that why there are so many students here. How will I ask?

Why are so many students in the class today?

Is it correct?

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Apr 23 '17 at 21:33

This question came from our site for linguists, etymologists, and serious English language enthusiasts.

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Strictly, Why are so many students in the class today? isn't the best way of putting it, but no-one would misunderstand.

Why are there so many students in class today? would prolly be better in US Engish

Simply Why are there so many students today? would prolly be better in British Engish

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Why are so many people in the class today? is an understandable question. I'd suggest you omit the definite article and by will either do not include or include there after are.

Depending on your knowledge of English and your mood, or whatever else, you may want to ask different, for instance, "Why is it so crowded today?"

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Well, asking questions is not a difficult task. This is all about how you think and what thoughts could come in your mind. A question will only arrise if you have a curiosity to know more about a particular thing. Like a question comeing in my mind? Where From You? How does it arrise. Because I'm curious to know more about you

That's how a question is arrise

  • I want to ask you a question: what do you mean by arrise? You've used it repeatedly (three times)! – mahmud koya Apr 23 '17 at 15:45
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    Unfortunately this has some major errors and seems to be answering the question, “How does one think of questions to ask” rather than, “how does one formulate a question one has thought of?” The first seems more philosophical and the second is better suited to our English Language Learners site. – Jim Apr 23 '17 at 16:00

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