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In a novel, two men speak about a good-looking lawyer in Antigua island One says to the other :

When you said she was a lawyer I was thinking of someone playing on a rubber tyre at the end of a chain.

I must admit I'm not sure of the pun intended here. Tyres mounted on chain may be used as a swing of sort, but what else could it be ? Meaning she's a dog ?

  • Please provide context— what is the name of the novel? What is the surrounding dialogue? This text seems to appear in only one other place on a web search, except the other says the setting is Guadaloupe. – choster Apr 24 '17 at 21:32
  • It is from False Nine by Phillip Kerr books.google.co.uk/… – James K Apr 24 '17 at 21:39
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'That’s her. That’s the lady lawyer I was talking about.'
'Man, that is a fine-looking woman.'
'You think?'
'When you said she was a lawyer I was thinking of someone playing on a rubber tyre at the end of a chain. But that lady is hot, boss.'
Everton was right. The woman had more curves than a bag full of footballs.

from False Nine by Philip Kerr

With the additional information above there are enough textual clues to understand that the words "someone playing on a rubber tyre at the end of a chain" refers to a girl who is young or looks young, whose body is not developed, boy-like. He means he assumed that this lawyer was a woman who wasn't physically beautiful and didn't have a lot of prospects to marry well so she worked hard and became a lawyer to be able to provide an income for herself. But, actually, the lady lawyer is very attractive (as well as intelligent).

  • Kind of a stupid analogy, since most lawyers are not preteens or what not. But it's Phillip Kerr. – green_ideas May 27 '17 at 16:13
  • I agree the analogy was a little inaccessible which is why it became a question, although it's not uncommon to hear women referred to as girls in other phrases. I don't think he meant to imply she was a preteen, merely that he had envisioned her as a woman whose undeveloped body would remind someone of a girl. I suppose if he had said rail or beanpole or twiggy it would have been easier to process, but these are equally metaphorical. – Brillig May 30 '17 at 14:54

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