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I had a coffee and conversation with a person couple of days ago and today I received following message from him today.

Hi, thank-you for coffee & conversation. Coffee was good, conversation was even better, but next time I wish to get a word in! Thank you and regards.

What does "... but next time I wish to get a word in!" mean? My understanding is that it means he wants to say something next time.

Does that mean I did something wrong? Does that say something negative about me? Does that give the feel that I didn't let him speak enough?

Update I did pay for the coffee for both of us. When I first read the message i thought he wants to buy me coffee next time but then i re-read the message and realised that it doesn;t make sense. Could it be the mobile phone's auto-correction feature over-correcting what he intended to say?

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Apr 25 '17 at 7:40

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    Get a word in - to succeed in saying something, although it is difficult to do this because other people are talking too: - He couldn't get a word in because she was talking so much. I'll try to get my suggestion in at the start of the meeting. dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/get-sth-in – user5267 Apr 21 '17 at 13:19
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    As above, wanting to "get a word in," or feeling like one wasn't able to, suggests that the other party (you, in this case) was talking too much or talking "over" the person. It suggests the person isn't happy about the situation. However, here it is confusing because someone would not typically say the "conversation was even better [than good]" if they were unhappy with it, or felt that they weren't given the opportunity to speak up. I suspect the person isn't using it correctly. Maybe they have something specific to share with you and either forgot or just didn't get around to it this time? – MDHunter Apr 21 '17 at 13:40
  • @MDHunter I did pay for the coffee for both of us. When I first read the message i thought he wants to buy me coffee next time but then i re-read the message and realised that it doesn;t make sense. Could it be the mobile phone's auto-correction feature over-correcting what he intended to say? :) – user1014923 Apr 22 '17 at 12:24
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It's hard to know without hearing his tone, but I think your friend may have been gently poking fun of your loquaciousness. He enjoyed the conversation but apparently did most of the listening, and now, without seeming too critical or mean, wants to make you aware of how talkative you are sometimes.

  • actually it was the opposite. He is a very talkative person and while he is speaking, it is very difficult to stop him but nevertheless i did do some interjections here and there. – user1014923 Apr 22 '17 at 12:19
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    @user1014923 Perhaps he was making a joke at his own expense? We have no way of knowing. The literal meaning is what you have been told. – michael.hor257k Apr 22 '17 at 12:38
  • So he was making fun of himself. That would be my conclusion. – debbiesym Apr 24 '17 at 15:44

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